Canada

CRA: 800,000 Ineligible People Did Not Get CERB, But They’re Checking Applications

Canada’s national tax agency clarified a major news organization’s allegations of CERB “ineligibility” is, well… not entirely accurate. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)  responded to our request for clarification on tax-filer application data yesterday. CRA spokesperson Pamela Tourigny didn’t just clarify the data, but also generously provided their take on CERB fraud, and how they plan on dealing with it. 

No, 800,000 Canadians Didn’t Collect CERB While Ineligible 

Despite the rumors started by a major news organization, the data doesn’t show hundreds of thousands of ineligible CERB claims. This mistake was due to people interpreting 800,000 claims without taxes filed in 2019, as ineligible. Like we pointed out when breaking down the impact to income flow, unfiled 2019 taxes didn’t necessarily mean applicants are ineligible. It just meant the data wasn’t ready, and will need verification later.  

“For the emergency benefits, there is no requirement for individuals to have filed a tax return. As such, it would be erroneous to conclude that claims from applicants who have not filed a tax return are being paid out to fraudsters or to non-eligible individuals. Income eligibility for Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) is determined based on an individual having earned a minimum of $5,000 (before taxes) in the last 12 months, or in 2019 from one of the following sources: employment, self-employment or provincial benefit payments related to maternity or paternity leave.”

The CRA Will Verify CERB Eligibility Next Tax Season

It would be naive to say some Canadians didn’t cheat the system. It’s a fact some people cheated to get CERB. However, it’s a little more difficult to know if they intentionally did it, or it was accidental. The CRA won’t have the full data to verify these circumstances until the end of this tax year. They mention they’ll be verifying this information during the next tax season. 

“…we will take steps at a later time to verify that claimants were eligible to receive payments for any COVID-related economic measures. The CRA has records of those who received the CERB and for what period. These will be used, along with tax slips received from employers and other relevant information available to the CRA, to validate eligibility next tax filing season. Where eligibility is in question, a review will be conducted to ensure that recipients were only paid amounts they were entitled to.” 

No, Repayment Won’t Be An Unfair Burden On Low Income Households

The other concern frequently circulating is low income Canadians found to be ineligible, will be punished. That’s not exactly the case. If the CRA finds people were ineligible, they plan on working with them to create a repayment plan based on their income. In this case, the economy essentially used a pull-forward mechanism on consumer spending. For those that refuse to repay if found ineligible, the agency claims they may take further legal action. Below is the statement from the CRA: 

“The CRA is sensitive to the hardship of Canadians still facing the financial impacts of COVID-19. The payment arrangement parameters have been expanded to give Canadians more time and flexibility to repay based on their ability to pay. If an individual is unable to repay ineligible CERB amounts, we will evaluate their situation and follow-up when their financial circumstances change. Canadians who applied for the CERB in good faith, and later determined they were ineligible will be required to pay money back without penalties or interest. For situations when an individual has the capacity to pay and refuses to reach a mutually acceptable payment arrangement, the CRA may take legal action.”

Like this post? Like us on Facebook for the next one in your feed.

3 Comments

COMMENT POLICY:
We encourage you to have a civil discussion. Note that reads "civil," which means don't act like jerks to each other. Still unclear? No name-calling, racism, or hate speech. Seriously, you're adults – act like it.

Any comments that violates these simple rules, will be removed promptly – along with your full comment history. Oh yeah, you'll also lose further commenting privileges. So if your comments disappear, it's not because the illuminati is screening you because they hate the truth, it's because you violated our simple rules.

  • SH 2 weeks ago

    From CRA’s statement, it sounds like CERB cheats will be given a pass. I except income tax on CERB to be forgiven too.

    Isn’t it great to be a law abiding, hardworking taxpayer in Canada?

    Never in my life have I seen rewards so drastically disconnected from actual work in Canada. If you play by the rules and work hard, your reward is excessive taxation and means-testing denial of benefits in order to pay for growing numbers in society who cheat. This is of course an issue in any welfare state however in Canada it seems to be the most extreme. Glad I left the country.

    • Brunolio 2 weeks ago

      Damn right.

      Small biz owners get nothing, yet continue to grind it out.
      Landlord would not renew lease and have been running my biz out of my car for 3 months. Impossible to find a rental in these conditions and taking months to get mortgage approval.

      Would be super easy to deek out of responsibilities and go set a tent up in the park and sell hot dogs. Get on some welfare, get a free hotel and free drug deliveries.

      Sheesh. What a country run by fools.

  • John 2 weeks ago

    Where to?

Comments are closed.